Tag Archives: TED talk

Confessions of a Comedian With Depression

What’s so haunting about this TED talk by Kevin Breel¬†a young writer, comedian and activist is how he could be just about any kid I know.

I realize anyone can suffer from depression at any time but you don’t think of young, athletic, academic and funny kids when you think of depression. You think of the kid who OBVIOUSLY doesn’t fit in and that circumstance leading to depression.

The thing is, how do I know that any of the 4 kids under my roof aren’t suffering or struggling with depression if, as Kevin described, it’s possible to present two different personas?

Let’s say my kids are all relatively healthy, mentally and emotionally speaking, it sounds like there’s a great chance that one or more of their friends, who otherwise looks healthy and stable is suffering. How can you tell?

Mental health issues are so stigmatized unlike other organs and body parts that are broken that it’s nearly impossible for kids to reach out to the people most likely to be able to help them.

I would love to hear what Kevin has to say about his parents’ role in helping him understand his depression and his ability to advocate for mental health. According to his website, he traveled extensively as a teenager doing stand-up comedy, it sounds like they’re pretty supportive.

If you watch this talk, please let me know if you also can’t stop thinking about it.

Kevin has a new book out that I’m anxious to read.

 

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7 Deadly Sins of Speech

I loved this presentation by sound expert (who knew there was such a thing?), Julian Treasure. It’s entertaining and practical.

Even if you don’t plan to give a public talk in the near future, this information applies to every day communication skills.

I could summarize the sins, but they’re much more effective coming from Treasure.

 

I haven’t read his book “Sound Business“, but I probably should since I think I suffer from a curmudgeonly sound-sensitivity as I get older. Sort of the opposite of hearing loss. The presentation was so useful that I’m guessing the book has some suggestions on how to ¬†optimize environments through sound (or no sound-which is what I would prefer).

 

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Ultra Low-Cost Higher Education Model

Free college education
The University of the People (UoPeople), a fully accredited online college, provides an affordable Business Administration or Computer Science degree (B.A. or Assoc.) to any high school graduate in the world with access to the internet (doesn’t have to be high-speed).

The interactive, virtual university has no facility costs, no textbooks and the professors volunteer their time. Though, the model is designed to limit the time commitment by faculty members which includes chancellors, presidents and other high-performing professionals.

Students are asked to pay $100 for exams which are graded by supervised peer review but scholarships are available in the case of financial hardship.

This is just one example of how technology can disrupt any industry, in this case, the business of higher education.

 

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Touch As An Antidote to Loneliness

This particular TED talk has personal implications for me.

As I mentioned in this post about my aunt’s improved health since she came to live with us, loneliness is as serious a health risk as smoking and obesity.

Helena Backlund Wasling, a leading researcher in the science and benefits of touch explains how soft touch activates parts of the brain that control emotion. It’s a key element in reducing stress, forming relationships and connecting with people.

31-days-of-ted-talks

When a Neuroscientist Has A Stroke

If you ever had a stroke or know someone who has, don’t miss this talk by Jill Bolte Taylor.

Bolte Taylor is a brain scientist who suffered a massive hemorrhagic stroke and lived not only to tell about it but show us how it’s possible to rebuild connections in the brain after a devastating event like that.

I have read her book, “My Stroke of Insight” repeatedly and refer it to people all the time. It’s one that borrowed from my mom but wanted my own copy.

Bolte Taylor does such a good job of explaining the difference between experiencing the world through her right brain for the very first time when the stroke damaged the left hemisphere. She tells how caregivers with high energy and sudden movements overwhelmed her and how her mom was her fiercest advocate and protector during her recovery. (I don’t want to give more than that away but her mom quickly became the hero of the story).

The other part I loved was her explanation of how a negative thought transmits chemicals through the entire body in about 15 seconds and her conscious efforts after the stroke to minimize or eliminate negative thoughts because of that.

 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through a link, I receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.